Given the culture of fear and being divided, lots of us have been fearful about what the world is coming to. And many of us don’t even know where to begin to make it better. Given all else that has been happening, we wonder what one person can even do.

The answer, at least in part, lies in our humanity. It lies in our connection with others.

I went out on the town a while ago with my husband’s two nieces. I did what I always do. I said hello to my cab driver. I asked a little about him. I chatted with the server. I said hello to other people in the nightclub. I asked the coat check person how long she had worked there. I shared a few my past nightclub stories from when I was a “coat check girl.”

My husband’s nieces were both impressed with how friendly I was (and also mildly embarrassed).

Not all of these interactions resulted in a connection. And some of them did.

Sure, some of the other night clubbers thought I was a bit weird. I could even see their faces screw up a bit in confusion. Some of them were wondering what this cougar was doing talking to them in the first place.

The night ended up being memorable.

This is because every interaction counts. Even the briefest of connections.

In a trumped up world that would have us be fearful and divided, we can remind ourselves of our connection to others. We can make it a point to connect with others in everything that we do.

Whether it is when we are buying our groceries, dealing with a clerk, or negotiating with another colleague, our interactions give us a chance to connect. And they count.

So many of us feel disjointed in our modern world. Many of us believe that human beings are losing our sense of connection with one another and of our sense of community. Many of us don’t know what to do about it. It seems so overwhelming and, given what is going on south of the border, in some ways, a lost cause.

We can each do our part.

Here is my call to action.

Think connection in human relationships. Think about connecting even for the short term. Think connection for the long term too.

  • Connect with the clerk next time we buy groceries;
  • Ask a friend to pop by;
  • Stop over at a friend’s for a cup of tea;
  • Organize a family get together;
  • Take a walk with a friend;
  • Make a call to family;
  • and
  • Well, you get the idea.

It all counts in a trumped up world.

By Val Hemminger